Archive for May, 2011

Weekly Reflection, 5/16

What was the most interesting thing you learned from your studies this week?
The most interesting thing I learned this week is how President Richard Nixon’s involvement in the Watergate scandal forced him to resign from office.

How might you apply something you learned this week to your life today?
I’ve realized that the Watergate scandal raised questions of public trust that still affect how the public and media view politicians today.

What would you like to learn more about? Why might you research more on your own?

I’d like to learn more information about the steps that the White House took in trying to cover up its involvement in the Watergate break-in, as well as the significance of Nixon’s taped conversations.

Write one detailed question about something you have studied this week that you would like an answer to:

If Nixon had admitted to and apologized for the Watergate break in, how might things have been different?

Advertisements

Weekly Reflection, 5/12

What was the most interesting thing you learned from your studies this week?
The most interesting thing I learned this week is how through protests and marches, women confronted social and economic barriers in American society during the women’s movemnt of the 1960s.

How might you apply something you learned this week to your life today?
I’ve realized that the rise of the women’s movement during the 1960s advanced women’s place in the work force and in society in today’s world.

What would you like to learn more about? Why might you research more on your own?

I’d like to learn more information about the counterculture movement and what factors led to the decline of the movement.

Write one detailed question about something you have studied this week that you would like an answer to:

What role did the counterculture and antiwar movement play in helping Richard Nixon Win the presidency?

Weekly Reflection, 5/4

What was the most interesting thing you learned from your studies this week?
The most interesting thing I learned this week is how activism pushed the  government to end segregation and ensure equal civil rights for African Americans.

How might you apply something you learned this week to your life today?
I’ve realized that many Supreme Court decisions made in the 1950s are the same ones that have gauranteed the civil rights for all Americans today.

What would you like to learn more about? Why might you research more on your own?

I’d like to learn more information about major civil rights leaders such as Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Write one detailed question about something you have studied this week that you would like an answer to:

What assumptions and beliefs guided the fierce opposition to the civil rights movement in the South?

American Dream ~ Pre-Reading Reflections

1. What is the American Dream?

I think the American Dream has changed over time. Initially, the American Dream represented the pursuit of material prosperity and unrealistic goals of instant and easy wealth. People often overlooked individuality and hard work, and desired acceptance and material goods instead. However, today, I think the idea of the American Dream means much more than fancy cars, big houses, and loads of money.  The American Dream has become less focused on financial gain and more focused on living a simple and fulfilling life. It’s the idea that anyone can succeed through hard work and that everyone has the potential to live happy and make individual choices. The American Dream has become something to work for, not a shortcut to wealth.

2. Is fiction sometimes more effective than fact to convey the “truth”?

Yes, I think fiction is sometimes more effective than fact to convey the truth because fiction can teach a reader many things about life that non-fiction, or fact, can overlook. In my opinion, fiction does more to show the truth on human feelings, thoughts, and ideas because it helps you understand different point of views and exposes you to things in life that you may not be aware of.

3. What is the purpose of a Tall Tale?

A Tall Tale is an exaggerated story about a larger-than-life character that can be fictional or based on a real person. I think the purpose of Tall Tales is to influence people to believe exaggerated stories, wether they’re based on actual events or not. Many newspapers during the late ninteenth century used yellow journalism by publishing exaggerations of news events in order to get more people to read and buy their paper. I think yellow journalism was similar to the telling of tall tales in the sense that they both used exaggerated information and unrealistic details.